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These pubmed results were generated on 2017/04/30

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As summer nears and more people prepare to go out in the sun, a dermatologist and dermatopathologist discusses the conflicting recommendations over full body skin inspections.
A genetic algorithm has been determined to confirm the rejection of classical notions of causality.
Testosterone makes men less likely to realize when they're wrong, a new study shows. The researchers found that men given doses of testosterone performed more poorly on a test designed to measure cognitive reflection than a group given a placebo.
Two studies have examined the state and quality of social and personality research and how practices have changed, if at all.
Although most topical steroids prescribed to patients were generic in a new American study, there was a sharp increase in Medicare Part D and out-of-pocket spending for elderly patients taking these drugs.
A five-year study has found the mechanism responsible for repairing damage to mitochondrial DNA. This discovery could pave the way for new treatments for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, say the researchers. This research may also have important implications for clinical advances in so called ‘three-parent baby’ mitochondrial donation.
In an analysis of Medicare billing data submitted by more than 2,300 United States physicians, researchers have calculated the average number of surgical slices, or cuts, made during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS), a procedure that progressively removes thin layers of cancerous skin tissue in a way that minimizes damage to healthy skin and the risks of leaving cancerous tissue behind.
The air we breathe out can help us improve the quality of the air we breathe in. But to do so, one needs a reliable way to calculate the concentration of carbon dioxide we produce indoors. Researchers have developed a new computation method that uses well-established concepts from the study of human metabolism and exercise physiology to significantly improve how this important data is derived.
A newly-created prognostic tool reliably predicts the recurrence of parathyroid cancer, enabling physicians to identify patients at the highest risk. Consequently, the tool also helps to determine the optimum postoperative strategy, including aggressive surveillance and additional treatments, according to study results.
Zika virus can persist in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), lymph nodes and colorectal tissue of infected rhesus monkeys for weeks after the virus has been cleared from blood, urine and mucosal secretions, according to a study.
The first study illustrating the safety and efficacy of endoscopic needle-knife therapy for intestinal strictures in patients with inflammatory bowel disorder has been released by physicians. The results appear to be promising.
Too much of the oncogene Bcl-3 leads to chronic intestinal diseases, report investigators. They describe in a new report exactly how it throws the immune system off-balance.
Antibiotics may impede the health properties of whole grain, especially for women, recent study demonstrates. The results emphasize the importance of maintaining a restrictive use of antibiotics.
Recent years have witnessed significant debates on proteins in milk, in particular the differences between A1 and A2 proteins. However, there is still no scientific evidence to determine whether milk with one protein type is healthier than the other.
Researchers have made the first detailed map of the regions into which the brain of one of the most closely-related organisms to the vertebrates is divided and which could give us an idea of what our ancestor was like.
Francisco Goya is the most important Spanish artist of the late 18th and early 19th century. In 1793, Goya, then 46, came down with a severe, undiagnosed illness. His hearing never returned. Now, a hearing expert has developed a diagnosis. She thinks Goya likely suffered from an autoimmune disease.
A team of researchers has managed to generate cartilage tissue by printing stem cells using a 3-D-bioprinter. The fact that the stem cells survived being printed in this manner is a success in itself. In addition, the research team was able to influence the cells to multiply and differentiate to form chondrocytes (cartilage cells) in the printed structure.
Patients at risk of developing bowel cancer can significantly benefit from a follow-up colonoscopy, finds new research.
Analysis of the drugs that were approved for use by the NHS Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) in England has shown that the fund was not good value for patients and society and may have resulted in patients suffering unnecessarily from toxic side effects of the drugs.
The majority of women suffering with pain when urinating, or needing to urinate often or urgently probably do have a bacterial infection, even when nothing is detected by standard urine testing.
There is an age-related decline in children’s physical activity levels as they progress through primary school, according to a British study.
A newly discovered molecule increases appetite during fasting, and decreases it during gorging. The neuron-exciting protein, named NPGL – apparently aims to maintain body mass at a constant, come feast or famine. An evolutionary masterstroke, but not great news for those looking to trim down, or beef up for the summer.
Nearly half of previously employed adult survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome were jobless one year after hospital discharge, and are estimated to have lost an average of $27,000 in earnings, new research concludes.
The difficulties of prioritizing preventable disease and long term health issues in post conflict zones are explored in a new report.
A gene previously identified as critical for tumor growth in many human cancers also maintains intestinal stem cells and encourages the growth of cells that support them, according to results of a study. The finding adds to evidence for the intimate link between stem cells and cancer, and advances prospects for regenerative medicine and cancer treatments.
Men over 50 have a higher risk than the general population of developing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, so they need to keep a sharp eye out for signs of the disease. Many women in this age group, however, would attest that they’re more likely than their male partners to notice suspicious spots on the skin — which means women could help save their male partners’ lives by helping them spot skin cancer.
Researchers have found a way to use artificial intelligence to fight a complication of diabetes that affects the eyes.
Researchers have developed a risk calculator that estimates the risk of kidney failure after donation. Overall risk was low, but black race and male sex were associated with increased risks of developing kidney failure in living kidney donors. Older age was associated with greater kidney failure risk in nonblack donors, but not in in black donors. Higher BMI and a close biological relationship to the recipient were also associated with increased risks of kidney failure.
Overweight and obese individuals with early stage type 2 diabetes (T2D) had more severe and progressive abnormalities in brain structure and cognition compared to normal-weight study participants, research indicates.
A method to rapidly trigger the universal tagging of proteins being produced by a cell has now been discovered by researchers. The tagging can be turned on like a switch, which enables researchers to acquire a snapshot of proteins being produced by a cell at a given time.
Food insecurity (FI) affects nearly 795 million people worldwide. Although a complex phenomenon encompassing food availability, affordability, utilization, and even the social norms that define acceptable ways to acquire food, FI can affect people's health beyond its impact on nutrition. A new study determined that FI was associated with poorer mental health and specific psychosocial stressors across global regions (149 countries), independent of individuals' socioeconomic status.
Individuals with a slender lower face are about 25 percent more likely to be left-handed. This unexpected finding was identified in 13,536 individuals who participated in three national surveys conducted in the United States. This association may shed new light on the origins of left-handedness, as slender jaws have also been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis, a disease that has shaped human evolution and which today affects 2 billion people.
Burn surgeons are seeing a rise in burns from electronic cigarettes. The study points to lithium ion battery failure as the culprit.
Reading supportive comments, 'likes' and private messages from social media friends prior to taking a test may help college students who have high levels of test-anxiety significantly reduce their nervousness and improve their scores, a new study suggests.
Elderly patients with early-stage esophageal cancer that received treatment had an increased 5-year overall survival when compared to patients who received observation with no treatment.
Although people living in consumer-based cultures such as the US often believe that they will be happier if they acquire more money, the findings of a newly published paper suggest that there may be downsides to this pursuit.
The most serious, life-threatening complication of dengue infection is dengue shock syndrome (DSS), seen primarily in children. Daily platelet counts in children in the early stages of dengue can predict those most at risk for DSS, researchers report.
The collection of microbial species found in the human body varies from person to person, and new research suggests that a significant part of this variation can be explained by variability in shared resources available to the microbes.
The Tibetan people have inherited variants of five different genes that help them live at high altitudes, with one gene originating in the extinct human subspecies, the Denisovans.
Physical activity can reduce the weight-gaining effects of the genetic variant that carries the greatest risk of obesity, report.
A gene has been identified that allows neurons that release serotonin to evenly spread their branches throughout the brain. Without this gene, these branches become entangled, leading to haphazard serotonin distribution, and signs of depression in mice. These observations shed light on how neuronal wiring is critical to overall brain health, while also revealing a promising new research focus for psychiatric disorders associated with serotonin imbalance -- such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and autism.
Glucoracle is a new app for people with type 2 diabetes that uses a personalized algorithm to predict the impact of particular foods on blood sugar levels.
Substances produced by a harmful bacterium in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients may enhance the growth of other bacteria that, in turn, inhibit the harmful bacterium's biofilm, according to new research.
Using CRISPR technology, a team of researchers rewired stem cells' genetic circuits to produce an anti-inflammatory arthritis drug when the cells encounter inflammation. The technique eventually could act as a vaccine for arthritis and other chronic conditions.
Expectant mothers need not be concerned that they are more prone to develop melanoma, or will have a worse prognosis if they do get this serious skin cancer, than women who are not pregnant, according to a study.
Researchers hope to one day use stem cells to heal burns, patch damaged heart tissue, even grow kidneys and other transplantable organs from scratch.
Approximately 14 million Americans have age-related macular degeneration, and a new study suggests it may be underdiagnosed in primary eye care settings.
Medically active substances are normally distributed via the blood -- either directly by injection into the bloodstream or indirectly, for example through the digestive tract after oral administration. In many diseases, however, it is of decisive importance to transport the active substance as efficiently as possible to the required target site. An example of this is the treatment of multiple sclerosis, where the pharmaceutical agents have to produce their effect above all in the central nervous system. However, this is especially difficult to achieve in the usual way via the blood due to special protective mechanisms such as the blood-brain barrier.
Girls start believing they aren't good at math, science and even computers at a young age -- but providing fun STEM activities at school and home may spark interest and inspire confidence, suggests a new study.
Children in low-income families have an increased chance of thriving when their caregiver relationships include certain positive characteristics, according to new research. Using data from more than 2,200 low-income families surveyed as part of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, researchers found that school-age children who reported high levels of parent involvement and supervision were more likely to report behaviors associated with positive emotional development and social growth.
A new analysis has broken new ground by finding gender differences in both symptoms and diagnoses of depression appearing at age 12.
Putting a turbo engine into an old car gives it an entirely new life -- suddenly it can go further, faster. That same idea is now being applied to neuroscience, with a software wrapper that can be used on existing neuron tracing algorithms to boost their ability to handle not just big, but enormous sets of data. The wrapper is called UltraTracer.
The significant presence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB), such as E. coli, among nursing home residents demonstrates the need for heightened infection control prevention and control measures in nursing homes, according to a meta-analysis now published.
An ingestible electronic capsule, complete with a capsule-sized antenna capable of receiving a radio signal wirelessly, can safely power a device in the gastrointestinal tract in preclinical models, investigators report.
Scientists have recreated and characterized the process of acquisition of resistance to chemotherapy in orthotopic animal models of breast cancer, unveiling the possibility of reversing this resistance after a period of rest from the treatment.
When people in a group are engaged with each other and with the world around them, their brainwaves show similar patterns. That's the conclusion of researchers who used portable EEG to simultaneously record brain activity from a class of high school students over the course of a semester as they went about their classroom activities. The findings highlight the promise of investigating the neuroscience of group interactions in real-world settings.
Worry -- it does a body good. And, the mind as well. A new paper argues there's an upside to worrying.
Less than half of Americans can recognize anxiety. Most people don't know what to do about depression even when they spot it. And nearly 8 in 10 don't recognize prescription drug abuse as a treatable problem.
Pairing the antidepressant amitriptyline with drugs designed to treat central nervous system diseases, enhances drug delivery to the brain by inhibiting the blood-brain barrier in rats, new research shows. The blood-brain barrier serves as a natural, protective boundary, preventing most drugs from entering the brain.
Public health researchers conducted a spatial epidemiology study to identify hotspot clusters of hepatitis C infections in Massachusetts. The information may help to make the best use of funding for education, prevention, testing, and treatment.

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