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These pubmed results were generated on 2017/09/21

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While football-related concussions have been top of mind in recent years, people have struggled to create technology to accurately measure them in real time. Engineers have now developed and tested a nano composite smartfoam that can be placed inside a football helmet (and pads) to more accurately test the impact and power of hits.
Electronic cigarettes have been touted as both a safer alternative for smokers and as an effective way for people to gradually quit smoking altogether. But a new study shows that nicotine inhaled from e-cigarettes can greatly increase a person's heart rate and aggravate the sympathetic nervous system.
By studying rodents, researchers showed that instead of attacking germs, some neutrophils may help heal the brain after an intracerebral hemorrhage, a form of stroke caused by ruptured blood vessels. The study suggests that two neutrophil-related proteins may play critical roles in protecting the brain from stroke-induced damage and could be used as treatments for intracerebral hemorrhage.
Communication breakdowns between care facilities can pave the way for outbreaks of infection, according to research on the spread of an extensively drug-resistant bacterium.
Biopharmaceuticals, medium- and high-molecular weight biologically active macromolecules, are not easily absorbed by the small intestine, the main organ responsible for gastrointestinal absorption, resulting in a bottleneck for oral administration type biopharmaceutical development. Now, researchers have found a new small intestine permeable peptide that can facilitate digestive tract absorption of biopharmaceutical products. The discovery should make it possible for oral administration of drugs that were previously only available by injection.
A new study shows that the so-called 'love hormone' oxytocin can intensify negative as well as positive experiences.
It's not always bad for children to be exposed to their parents' disagreements. It's how those disagreements are handled that really matters, according to a new study.
A new role has been identified for the major Alzheimer's risk factor ApoE4, suggesting that targeting the protein may help treat the disease. Researchers show that ApoE4 exacerbates the brain damage caused by toxic tangles of a different Alzheimer's-associated protein: tau. In the absence of ApoE, tau tangles did very little harm to brain cells.
The growth of certain aggressive brain tumors can be halted by cutting off their access to a signaling molecule produced by the brain's nerve cells, according to a new study.
A new study of the human microbiome has uncovered millions of previously unknown genes from microbial communities in the human gut, skin, mouth, and vaginal microbiome, allowing for new insights into the role these microbes play in human health and disease.
Victims of gunshots and stabbings are significantly less likely to die if they're taken to the trauma center by a private vehicle than ground emergency medical services (EMS), according to results of a new analysis.
Researchers have used genome editing technology to reveal the role of a key gene in human embryos in the first few days of development. This is the first time that genome editing has been used to study gene function in human embryos, which could help scientists to better understand the biology of our early development.
Photos of the same person can look substantially different. For example, your passport photo may look quite different from your driving license, or your face in holiday photos. Research has shown when photos of an individual's face are judged too dissimilar to go together, people will tend to think they show several different identities. Scientists have tested this concept further by exploring what happens when the photos show faces with different expressions.
Relationships with our mothers and siblings continue to have an effect on our well-being, particularly at midlife. A new study found that tension with our mothers and siblings, similar to our spouses, is associated with symptoms of depression.
Even after years of smoking, the body has a remarkable ability to repair itself. Now in a study shows that certain metabolic changes occur soon after quitting, and these changes could help explain how some ill-effects of smoking might be reversible.
Specific immune cells have the ability to produce a healing factor that can promote wound repair in the intestine, a finding that could lead to new, potential therapeutic treatments for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a new research study.
Opening up a new pathway to fight cancer, researchers have found a way to target an enzyme that is crucial to tumor growth while also blocking the mechanism that has made past attempts to target that enzyme resistant to treatment. Researchers were able to use this finding to develop a drug that successfully inhibits tumor growth of melanoma as well as pancreatic and colorectal cancer in mice.
Researchers have uncovered a new connection in the network of checks and balances underlying cellular iron regulation.
Results from an unexpected quarter is could help neurologists to identify which brain region to remove to eliminate an epilepsy patient’s symptoms. Mathematicians have shown that it is sensible to examine the interconnections between different brain regions closely, instead of searching for abnormal regions only.
A new study has discovered that shy children with low English vocabulary skills, can still be popular among their peers if they have high-functioning social communication skills that enable them to engage and interact well with their peers in social settings.
Trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in civilian women were strongly associated with increased risk of developing lupus, an autoimmune disease.
Researchers have developed a new tool called the San Diego Wisdom Scale (SD-WISE) to assess an individual's level of wisdom, based upon a conceptualization of wisdom as a trait with a neurobiological as well as psychosocial basis.
New guidelines may be in order for evaluating and treating lower extremity pain. Investigators set out to determine if there was a relation between foot pain and lower extremity joint pain, and they found a significant association between foot pain and knee or hip pain.
Scientists have uncovered two closely related cytokines -- molecules involved in cell communication and movement -- that may explain why some people develop progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), the most severe form of the disease. The findings point the way toward developing a novel treatment to prevent progressive forms of the disease.
For the first time, scientists have used Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging to study brain inflammation following Zika virus infection in mice, according to a study. Traditional methods of infectious disease research using animal models provide limited information about disease progression until the study's endpoint, when investigators can analyze tissues from those animals. Imaging studies allow longitudinal studies of the same animal during the course of infection.
A world-first study into online sperm donor behavior has revealed the importance men place on their family, friends and the risks associated with donation, has little impact on their motivation or psychology when choosing to donate their sperm to women they meet online.
Researchers have identified the process that shuts down the human heart's ability to heal itself, and are now searching for a drug to reverse it. Scientists have shown a metabolic pathway governs the loss of the heart's proliferative capacity.
Sindoor -- a cosmetic powder sold in the United States and used during Hindu religious and cultural ceremonies -- has unsafe levels of lead, according to a study. Researchers say at a minimum there is a need to monitor sindoor lead levels and make the public aware of the potential hazards.
New research suggests there's wide variation in the risk that unmanned aircraft pose to people on the ground.
Workers who were likely exposed to dispersants while cleaning up the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill experienced a range of health symptoms including cough and wheeze, and skin and eye irritation.
Pregnant smokers are more likely to quit if they can learn to manage negative emotions that lead to smoking, new research indicates.
Hospitals facing the prospect of ransomware attacks like the one that afflicted British hospitals in May can take many concrete steps to better protect themselves, but some of the most important measures -- such as a national policy not to pay ransoms -- may be tougher to formulate.
By reprogramming skin cells into nerve cells, researchers are creating cell models of the human brain. The researchers describe how cells from patients with the severe developmental disease lissencephaly differ from healthy cells. The method can provide vital new knowledge on difficult-to-study congenital diseases.
People who monitor their own blood pressure at home are most likely to see a benefit if they combine it with individually tailored intensive support, according to a new systematic literature review and meta-analysis.
Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing detects a higher number of precancerous cervical lesions than cytology-based Pap smears in a female population including a proportion offered HPV vaccination, according to a new study.
The discovery of a previously overlooked site on protein molecules may solve a mystery about how proteins are able to carry out specialized functions in living cells.
Researchers have identified a pair of proteins that show promise as the basis for a gonorrhea vaccine.
How many undergraduate classes in microbiology -- or any scientific field, for that matter -- can say they're published in a peer-reviewed journal? Now there is a new review of the primary literature and latest discoveries on the interactions between gut microbiota and the human host.
Lying comes more easily to people in teams: Behavioral scientists have shown in an experimental study why groups are more likely to behave unethically than individuals.
Despite the popular narrative that the web is to blame for rising political polarization, a study by economists has found that recent growth in polarization is greatest for demographic groups in which individuals are least likely to use the internet and social media. This means that data does not support the claim that the internet is the most significant driver of partisanship.
Sleep deprivation - typically administered in controlled, inpatient settings - rapidly reduces symptoms of depression in roughly half of depression patients, according the first meta-analysis on the subject in nearly 30 years.
It is estimated that up to 75 percent of breast cancer survivors experience problems with cognitive difficulties following treatments, perhaps lasting years. Currently, few science-based options are available to help. Researchers report in a pilot study of 87 female breast cancer survivors an increase in physical activity more than doubled the women's post-treatment mental processing speed.
A recent study has overturned a common belief about how a certain class of proteins in the spinal cord regulate the formation of nervous system cells -- called neurons -- during embryonic development.
Footballers in flashy cars, City workers in Armani suits, reality TV celebrities sipping expensive champagne while sitting in hot tubs: what drives people to purchase luxury goods? New research suggests that it may be a sense of being a 'winner' -- but that contrary to expectations, it is not driven by testosterone.
A new mechanism by which cancer cells evade destruction by the immune system has been discovered by a team of researchers. Their paper describes how immune cells known as group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) are recruited by leukemic cells to suppress an essential anticancer immune response.
As tick populations grow and spread across the country, their prevalence is increasing the public’s risk for some troubling diseases. Of these diseases, say dermatologists, Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Powassan virus and alpha-gal syndrome —- a mysterious red meat allergy -— are among the most serious.
Emotional responses to failure rather than cognitive ones are more effective at improving people's results for the next time they tackle the next related task, new research indicates.
Among obese women undergoing cesarean delivery, a postoperative 48-hour course of antibiotics significantly decreased the rate of surgical site infection within 30 days after delivery, according to a study.
Between 2000 and 2015 in the US, life expectancy increased overall but drug-poisoning deaths, mostly related to opioids, contributed to reducing life expectancy, according to a study.
Men and women with shorter, wider faces tend to be more sexually motivated and to have a stronger sex drive than those with faces of other dimensions. The research investigates the role that facial features play in sexual relationships and mate selection.
When it comes to male reproductive fertility, timing is everything. Now scientists are finding new details on how disruption of this timing may contribute to male infertility or congenital illness. Researchers are identifying the key molecular and genetic switch that activates production of healthy male sperm -- but only when the time is right.
Cell therapies being developed to treat a range of conditions could be improved by a chemical compound that aids their survival, research suggests. Lab tests found that the human-made molecule -- a type of antioxidant -- helps to shield healthy cells from damage such as would be caused when they are transplanted into a patient during cell therapy.
Solitary weasel-like animals called tayra might look pretty harmless, but some may actually be incubators for a parasite that causes Chagas disease, a chronic, debilitating condition that is spread by insects called kissing bugs and affects more than 8 million people worldwide.
Playing American football before the age of 12 may have long-term consequences for players' mood and behavior, according to a study involving 214 professional and amateur football players.
Children exposed to high indoor levels of pet or pest allergens during infancy have a lower risk of developing asthma by 7 years of age, new research reveals. The findings may provide clues for the design of strategies to prevent asthma from developing.
Researchers have shown that the increased incidence of infections seen in spinal cord injury patients is directly linked to a disruption of the normal central nervous system.
Researchers discover a large number of clustered mutations in a single gene, TRIO, that disrupt the development of the brain's connections and likely contribute to the development of autism-spectrum disorders. The scientists also find that a sister gene linked to schizophrenia, KALRN, is inactive in early brain development, but becomes active in adolescence.
Immune-cell based therapies opening a new frontier for cancer treatment carry unique, potentially lethal side effects that provide a new challenge for oncologists, one addressed by proposed guidelines for systematically dealing with the toxicities of these drugs.
By reprogramming skin cells into nerve cells, researchers are creating cell models of the human brain. In a new study, the researchers describe how cells from patients with the severe developmental disease lissencephaly differ from healthy cells. The method can provide vital new knowledge on difficult-to-study congenital diseases.
An epileptic seizure may be highly local, but it also influences brain activity at a distance of over ten centimeters from the core. This, in turn, affects the active area, scientists report.

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