869 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

jsubsetaim

These pubmed results were generated on 2017/05/26

PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Changing natural electrical signaling in non-neural cells improves innate immune response to bacterial infections and injury. Tadpoles that received therapeutics, including those used in humans for other purposes, which depolarized their cells had higher survival rates when infected with E. coli than controls. The research has applications for treatment of emerging diseases and traumatic injury in humans.
Diesel pollution is linked with heart damage, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2017.
A genetic variant that protects the heart against cardiovascular disease has been discovered. The cardioprotective variant was found in an isolated Greek population, who are known to live long and healthy lives despite having a diet rich in animal fat.
Teachers who have an authentic teaching style are more positively received by their students, according to new research.
Researchers analysed data of hundreds of UK children who had been born through IVF or ICSI (when the man has a low sperm count), testing the same groups of children every few years up to the age of 11. They found a positive association between artificial conception and cognitive development when a child was between the ages of three and five.
A study leverages the unvarnished opinions of Redditors to further our understanding of what makes a good educator.
Both the literature and practice indicate that children can stand without support starting at around 9 months old. Yet, with practice, children can stand without support even before they are 4 months old. This is much earlier than has been reported in the literature.
A new computational modeling technique could indicate when atherosclerotic plaques will likely undergo rapid growth, reports a new study.
The virus that causes chickenpox -- varicella zoster virus (VZV) -- possesses a protein that could enhance its ability to hijack white blood cells and spread throughout the body, according to new research.
Researchers have identified a new way to potentially slow the fast-growing cells that characterize all types of cancer. By removing a specific protein from cells, they were able to slow the cell cycle, which is out of control in cancer. The findings were made in kidney and cervical cancer cells and are a long way from being applied in people, but could be the basis of a treatment option in the future.
Human social groups have a strange tendency to share responsibility for taking care of infants; parents, older siblings, and other adult relatives all help to nurture babies. The only other primates that take care of infants this way are marmosets, a group of small, highly social monkeys from South America. In another striking parallel to humans, infant marmosets also benefit from frequent feedback while learning their vocal calls.
As children age into adolescence and on into young adulthood, they show dramatic improvements in their ability to control impulses, stay organized, and make decisions. Those 'executive functions' of the brain are key factors in determining outcomes, including educational success, drug use, and psychiatric illness. Now, researchers have mapped the changes in the network organization of the brain that underlie those improvements in executive function.
Using fruit flies, researchers have discovered a cascade of molecular signals that program gene activity to drive the fly from one stage of maturation to the next, like a baby turning into an adult. Part of this programming involves alterations to the way DNA is packaged. Those alterations open certain regions of DNA to allow gene activity and close off other regions to prevent gene activity. These changes to DNA accessibility occur in sequence.
Researchers have discovered that a molecule which can sense the swelling of fat cells also controls a signaling pathway that allows fat cells to take up and store excess glucose. Mice missing this protein, known as SWELL1, gain less weight (fat) than normal mice on a high-fat diet, but also develop diabetes.
A new study finds that a 12-week program of instruction and practice of the Chinese martial art tai chi led to significantly reduced symptoms of depression in Chinese-Americans not receiving any other treatments.
Fathers with toddler daughters are more attentive and responsive to those daughters' needs than fathers with toddler sons are to the needs of those sons, according to brain scans and recordings of the parents' daily interactions with their kids.
$6 million in costs related to the opioid epidemic could be saved each year if a single 'safe consumption' space for illicit drug users were opened in Baltimore, a new cost-benefit analysis suggests.
Combinations of three antibiotics -- that are each ineffective against superbugs when used alone -- are capable of eradicating two of the six ESKAPE pathogens when delivered together, scientists have discovered.
Globally, every 30 seconds a diabetic has a limb amputated because of a non-healing wound. A molecule produced by a Thai liver parasite could be the solution to those non-healing wounds -- and scientists are now able to produce a version of the molecule on a large enough scale to make it available for laboratory tests and eventually clinical trials.
Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) -- a non-invasive technique for applying electric current to areas of the brain -- may be growing in popularity, but new research suggests that it probably does not add any meaningful benefit to cognitive training.
Researchers have developed a new device to map the brain during surgery and distinguish between healthy and diseased tissues. The device provides higher resolution neural readings than existing tools used in the clinic and could enable doctors to perform safer, more precise brain surgeries.
Blood thinners, such as aspirin, reduce the risk of thrombus formation but also interfere with the initial clot formation that is essential for preventing blood loss from the wounds. Now researchers have discovered that a molecule plays a role in thrombus development, but not the initial clot formation, suggesting a new avenue for developing more specific and protective blood thinners.
Scientists studying the genetics of Zika virus in Brazil and beyond has provided a new understanding of the disease and its rapid spread through space and time. The research has significant public health implications and has the potential to improve responses to future outbreaks.
Though it has gained popularity in the West as medically and psychologically beneficial, meditation can produce a much wider variety of outcomes, not all of them calm and relaxing, according to a new study that analyzes meditation-related challenges.
A novel mechanism behind the resistance of breast cancer brain metastases to HER2- or PI3K-targeted therapies has been discovered, and a treatment strategy has now been identified that may overcome this resistance.
With the abuse of opioids on the rise in the United States, researchers are concerned that increased HIV transmission from shared needles won't be far behind.
Analysis of the largest collection of Zika genomes to date reveals the trajectory and evolution of the virus as it spread throughout the Americas, with implications for future surveillance efforts.
Reading is such a modern cultural invention that there is no specific area in the brain dedicated to it. Scientists have found that learning to read as an adult reconfigures evolutionarily ancient brain structures hitherto assigned to different skills. These findings were obtained in a large-scale study in India in which completely illiterate women learned how to read and write for six months.
Patients walking in clinical robotic suits do not modify their gait in response to forces that are meant to alter the height of their steps, though they do respond to alterations in step length, providing insight into how the human brain executes walking and improving rehabilitative robot design, researchers have discovered.
With mosquito season looming in the Northern Hemisphere, doctors and researchers are poised to take on a new round of Zika virus infections. Now a new study explains how Zika virus entered the United States via Florida in 2016 -- and how it might re-enter the country this year.
Intranasal oxytocin can influence how individuals with autism perceive emotion in others, a recent study has demonstrated. This is an important first step for a potential pharmacological treatment of autism.
In accidents or terror attacks which are suspected to involve radioactive substances, it can be difficult to determine whether people nearby have been exposed to radiation. But by analysing mobile phones and other objects which come in close contact with the body, it is possible to retrieve important information on radiation exposure.
Older patients who underwent major abdominal surgery and received an intervention that included nutritional assistance and early mobilization were less likely to experience delirium and had a shorter hospital stay, according to a study.
The benefits of light alcohol consumption, as well as the risks associated with not drinking at all, might not be as great as previously thought, according to researchers who examined the drinking habits of middle-aged adults.
Exposure to trace metals from potatoes grown in soil irrigated with waters from the Potosi mining region in Bolivia, home to the world's largest silver deposit, may put residents at risk of non-cancer health illnesses, researchers warn.
Although cannabis had been used for many centuries for treatment of seizure disorders, medical use became prohibited in the 20th century. However, with the loosening of laws regarding medical marijuana, research and clinical use of marijuana-derived substances are increasing. This has prompted the publishing of an in-depth assessment of the potential of cannabinoids for the effective treatment of epilepsy. Cannabinoids are components of the cannabis plant.
A new study shows mindfulness training that addresses fear and pain during childbirth can improve women's childbirth experiences and reduce their depression symptoms during pregnancy and the early postpartum period.
Clostridium botulinum is the bacterium that causes the neurointoxication, which produces one of the most potent toxins on earth and is classified as a potential bioterrorism threat. While no cure exists -- and botulism treatment options are limited -- a serendipitous discovery may provide a new therapy that can stop the neurotoxin even in its more severe, advanced stages of action.
Researchers have found evidence of specific neurochemical changes associated with lower neuronal health in these brain regions. Further, they report that some of these changes in the brain may persist in individuals who receive hand transplants, despite their recovered hand function.
Contrary to the condition's name, heart failure doesn't mean the heart has stopped pumping -- it's just not working at full strength. It can often be managed with medications and lifestyle changes, but its progression needs to be monitored closely. Now scientists have developed a new test strip that could potentially allow patients to do this at home for the first time.
At a time of change and uncertainty across the country, American adults who have been affected by change at work are more likely to report chronic work stress, less likely to trust their employer and more likely to say they plan to leave the organization within the next year compared with those who haven't been affected by organizational change, according to a survey.
Our cells are rich in proteins which are potential targets for therapy. But study of these proteins' behavior, using externally delivered biomacromolecules, has often been stymied by the difficulty of gaining access to the interiors of living cells.
New research takes a closer look at how music influences the mood in people suffering from depression, and examines what factors might affect whether listening to sad music in group settings provides social benefits for listeners, or if it rather reinforces depressive tendencies.
Researchers have developed a molecule which has the potential to become the first fully synthetic, one-dose treatment for malaria.
About half of parents reported that technology interrupted time with their children three or more times on a typical day. Even in low amounts, interruptions to parent-child time caused by digital technology are associated with greater child behavior problems, a new study suggests.
Is it possible to watch at the level of single cells how fish embryos become trout, carp or salmon? Researchers have successfully combined two very advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques. The new high-resolution light microscope permits fascinating insights into a cell's interior.
Scientists have unlocked mysteries of how the Ebola virus hampers the body's natural defenses to speed the rate of infection and its accompanying lethal disease, according to a new report.
Mathematical models can be used to predict how different tumor cell populations interact with each other and respond to a changing environment, research suggests.
While the number of hospitalizations for COPD in the United States fluctuated within a narrow range between 2005 and 2014, in-hospital deaths decreased substantially during that same time, according to new research.
A machine-learning algorithm has the capability to identify hospitalized patients at risk for severe sepsis and septic shock using data from electronic health records (EHRs), according to a new study. Sepsis is an extreme systemic response to infection, which can be life-threatening in its advanced stages of severe sepsis and septic shock, if left untreated.
Traumatic events, such as a terrorist attack or natural disaster, can effect children's perceptions of competence. According to a new study, children with higher levels of competence were more resilient and had fewer PTSD symptoms following a traumatic event.
Carrying fat around your middle could be as good an indicator of cancer risk as body mass index (BMI), according to new research.
One out of three people in the world is exposed to earthquakes, a number which almost doubled in the past 40 years. Around 1 billion in 155 countries are exposed to floods and 414 million live near one of the 220 most dangerous volcanoes. The 2017 edition of the  Atlas of the Human Planet looks at the exposure of people and built-up areas to the six major natural hazards, and its evolution over the last 40 years.
The human brain is much better than previously thought at discovering and avoiding disease, a new study reports. Our sense of vision and smell alone are enough to make us aware that someone has a disease even before it breaks out. And not only aware – we also act upon the information and avoid sick people.
A novel handheld device, known as CLiKX, has been developed for the treatment of a condition called Otitis Media with Effusion (OME), or ‘glue ear’, which is the leading cause of hearing loss and visits to the doctors among children worldwide. The invention, which is sensor-guided and easy to use, could significantly improve current surgical treatment of the condition.
Difficulties in initiating or maintaining sleep at middle-age are associated with an increased risk of dementia, according to a new study. The 20-year follow-up study was conducted among 2,682 men participating the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Study. Shorter or longer sleep than 7–7.5 hours related independently with an increased risk of lung cancer after health behavior, such as smoking, was taken account of. Additionally, a relationship between higher serum copper levels and short sleep duration was observed.
A new technique has been developed to examine human sperm without killing them -- helping to improve the diagnosis of fertility problems. The new test uses Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to examine the molecules in live sperm. Early data suggests it could discriminate between populations of good and poor sperm.
If every cell in our body is a factory, viruses are industrial spies who try to break in and take over. New findings about how one of the most mysterious types of spy - polyomaviruses -- accomplishes this feat could aid the fight against Merkel cell carcinoma, and diseases in organ transplant and cancer patients.
The identification of 16 additional genetic markers will help researchers get closer to understanding how -- and why -- psoriasis develops.
People may try to make someone else feel negative emotions if they think experiencing those emotions will be beneficial in the long run, according to new research. The findings expand on previous research by revealing that people may sometimes seek to induce negative emotions in others for altruistic reasons, not simply for their own pleasure or benefit.

Clinical/PICO Search

for DHA
Help?

Management/PICOC Search

for DHA
Help?
PubMed Logo